Saturday, February 7, 2009

I don't have a job, then why am I so busy?

The thought crossed my mind, the other day, "if I don't have a job, then how come I'm so busy?"

Right now, I don't know how I'd ever find the time to do the things I do, every day, and hold down a job, a the same time.

I guess I'm my own job. The pay hasn't been so bad and is actually about to get better. The only problem is.....benefits. Need to think about that one.

For the past few years, I've been doing just about nothing more than driving a truck across the 48 contiguous states. Out of necessity, of course.

Now I find myself at home, at retirement age, and can't find a single day of doing nothing.

I started taking on custom mold making jobs. That has turned into a full time job, all by itself.

Having retrieved all my ceramics equipment and supplies, out of storage and into a double garage, my thoughts turned to one of my heart's greatest desires-teaching. Now, I'm lined up to do hand building pottery classes and there seems to also be a desire to learn more about mold pouring.

When I list the things I could teach, I find there isn't enough of a lifetime left, to cover it all. I'll sure try.

All this reminds me of something my grandmother told me, many years ago. I was just a child, at the time. Grandmother had a little Christian Supply shop and craft supply store. She said, "Judy, if you ever want to go into business, the way to start is by teaching. You teach a technique that requires the supplies you have in your store, and sell your students those supplies. That's how to start."

From time to time, I think about her words. So today, I pass on that little bit of wisdom, to you.

If you find yourself pulling on those rope ends and not quite making it, from month to month - teach.

You don't have to have a special license to teach something you know. If you're willing to teach and you have students willing to pay you for them to learn, you have a class. Either have a good supply of the materials needed for the projects, or cover the costs of those materials in the tuition. Don't forget your knowledge is worth money. :)

I'm about to start teaching hand built pottery. Next, in the plans, is to get my equipment up and running, a supply of clay slip and start yet another class in pouring ceramic molds. I just may go on to teaching mold making.

I have a knitting machine, I haven't had time to touch since 1987 and boy, would I love to get back at it. Once upon a time, I was very good with the knitting machine, designing my own clothes and making custom fit. I'd have to spend some time alone, to remember all these things but then look at all the more classes, I could host.

I could teach sewing and knitting and crochet and all sorts of time honored crafts. Right now, I'm giving my own grandson lessons with the scroll saw and plan to graduate him into the whole aspect of wood working and furniture building. Even if I have to learn it myself, as we go along. :)

You, too, probably have a world of knowledge in you. Sit down and make a list. Then start asking around. "What would you think of me starting classes in ???" You might be surprised.

If you can't sell them your end product, maybe they want to learn how to make it themselves.

Look at this list of classes. You might be surprised.
Cooking
Baking
Running a household
Organizing your home
How to make money, cleaning out the garage
Canning
Gardening

and now for the crafts:
knitting
crochet
sewing
quilting
macrame
jewelry making
clay work
wood working

and a whole slew of simple projects like
embroidery
rug hooking
and more that you've already thought of.

Just because it's 'old shoe' to you, doesn't mean it is to others. You have to remember that not everybody has your talents and just might desire to learn.

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About Me

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I'm a grandmother of 1, a ceramist, a ceramic mold maker, a truck driver and writer.

I'm also a webmaster of many and have several blogs.

I help others in designing product, make custom molds and I still do restorations.